Saturday, May 23, 2020

The Safety of Using Anabolic Steroids Essay example

The Safety of Using Anabolic Steroids Even if you didnt have any or little knowledge of steroids and were asked this question, you would probably answer no. Why? Would it be because a high school kid somewhere in California died from taking them? Or would it be because you read it in Readers Digest? Many people think you are selling your soul to the devil when you take steroids. There is an incredible amount of myths, misinformation, and misconceptions about anabolic steroid use and their dangers. Although there are risks, most people are misinterpreting them. One of the biggest misconceptions about steroids is that it is a magic pill. A magic pill that will transform a 130 pound weakling into the hulk in a month.†¦show more content†¦These sites include muscle, hair, sebaceous glands, endocrine gland, and the brain. Side effects unfortunately come with the use of anabolic steroids. Side effects vary with the person and sometimes dont occur, however there are common ones. Most side effects come from ste roids that are more androgenic than anabolic so they can very depending on the drug. Androgenic is the precursor of the male characteristics of muscle size and strength, deeper voices, body hair, sex drive, and aggressiveness. Another side effect is gynocemastia. Gynecomastia is also referred to as bitch tits. This is the abnormal breast like tissue, which can develop in males using large doses of steroids. This is also naturally occurring in some men. Gynecomastia develops from testosterone aromatizing in the body and converting to estrogen. Estrogen is the naturally hormone produced in the female body. It is the hormone responsible for female secondary sexual characteristics. Aromatizing occurs when testosterone passes through the bloodstream and doesnt attach themselves to the corresponding receptors. The testosterone that is left over has to pass through the bloodstream a second time and converts to estrogen. The estrogen then collects to the mammary glands, which are located in the nipple area of a mans chest to form deposits. They will eventually start to resemble womans breast. Shrinking of theShow MoreRelatedUse of Steroids by Athletes Essay1538 Words   |  7 Pagessports regulating bodies such as the International Olympic Committee have banned certain performance-enhancing substances because of safety and fair play issues. However, many athletes feel that they have to use steroids to be competitive in the international sporting arena. Athletes believe that everyone else is using these products, and thus anyone who does not use steroids is putting himself or herself at a disadvantage. This dichotomy between athletes and regulating bodies represents the major controversyRead More Steroids and Sports Essay1324 Words   |  6 PagesSteroids and Sports Steroids, ever since their introduction into the sports world five decades ago, they have been a controversial issue (WebMD medical news). Anabolic performance dates as far back as the original Olympic Games. Today walking into any gym you will find some one who is using steroids or some kind of enhancement supplement. Anabolic steroids are so popular with athletes from high School level all the way up to the top. For the past fifty years, athletes around the world use steroidsRead MoreBenefits Of Using Creatine And Anabolic Steroids Essay906 Words   |  4 Pageseffects of another performance enhancing substance. The most used performance enhancing supplements are creatine and anabolic steroids. Creatine is a naturally occurring compound that is produced from amino acids by the kidneys and liver. It is also found in foods such as poultry, fish and meat. Creatine monohydrate is produced commercially for use as a supplement. There are benefits of using creatine as a performance enhancing supplement which include; supplying energy to muscles, delay fatigue duringRead MoreAnabolic Steroid Is A Synthetic Hormone That Resembles1694 Words   |  7 PagesAnabolic steroid is a synthetic hormone that resembles testosterone in promoting the growth of muscle. Such hormones are used medicinally to treat some forms of weight loss and illegally by some athletes and others to enhance physical performance, Anabolic refers to muscle-building, and steroids refers to a large group of chemical substances classified by a specific carbon structure. Since their creation in the early 1930’s, steroids have been praised for their effectiveness by users, debated overRead More Steroids In Sport Essay695 Words   |  3 Pageseveryday to perfect their game.Then there are those who take an alternative route. Now athletes are taking performance enhancers such as creatine, androstenedione and worst of all, anabolic steroids.Steroids are chemicals that act like hormones (substances in your body that regulate bodily functions). Anabolic steroids are the ones that are abused to build muscle mass or to make your workout longer. They are chemicals of artificial testosterone, which is a male hormone. With higher testosteroneRead MoreShould Steroids Be Illegal For Athletes?900 Words   |  4 Pagesâ€Å"If steroids are illegal for athletes, then why isn’t photoshop illegal for models?†. Documented steroid usage has increased significantly over the past decade, however this paper contends that with the help of medical research, medical surveys and first hand experience, I will demonstrate steroids are not as hazardous as the general public perceives steroids to be. As steroid use continues to be identified in the news, a growing trend in America and all over the world right now seems to be askingRead MoreThe Effects Of Steroids On The Human Body, Steroids Sports, And Reasons Why People Use Steroids1251 Words   |  6 PagesJared Hipsher Mrs. Sexton 3-26-15 English 10 Steroids Jared Hipsher 3-26-2015 English 10 Mrs. Sexton Steroids Thesis : The history of steroids, the affects of steroids on the human body, steroids in sports, and reasons why people use steroids, are all things I ve wanted to know for a long time now I am going to further my knowledge on this topic. Introduction About A. Types 1. Anabolic 2. Corticosteroids III. History A. 1954 1. Weight liftingRead MoreThe Use of Performance Drugs in Sports Essay1024 Words   |  5 Pagesdoing drugs and its ruining their health and life. Also, if some teenagers take performance drugs they are making them better than everyone else giving themselves an advantage over everyone else which is cheating, so why should they get money for using drugs to win, how do we know they arent actually good at the sport? Performance drugs in sport should not be tolerated and should be illegal. Stores shouldnt give teenagers drugs that way they can do well in a sport. Many student athletes want toRead MoreIn The August 8Th And 15Th Issue Of The New Yorker, Mark1463 Words   |  6 Pagestourist rates come with the risk of injuries or infection. The Zika virus was one that many was not sure how to control and keep the safety of everyone first. The Zika virus is spread through infected mosquitos, pregnant mothers which can cause defects on certain births. Zika virus is related to yellow fev er, Japanese encephalitis and West Nile. With much of humanities safety as state the Olympic committee were up to a challenge. Despite the problem at the games, this virus has taken the lives of manyRead MoreAnabolic Steroids And Substance Steroids1814 Words   |  8 PagesMerriam-Webster Dictionary anabolic steroids are any of a group of usually synthetic hormones that are derivatives of testosterone, are used medically specially to promote tissue growth, and are sometimes abused by athletes to increase the size and strength of their muscles and improve endurance. The main purpose of anabolic steroids is to gain strength and muscle very quickly and faster than any other drug enhancement. There are many types of models that relate to anabolic steroids. One model is high school

Tuesday, May 12, 2020

Nike Case Study - 1112 Words

Case Study- Nike 1. Discuss how Nikes growth can be attributed to its targeting of diverse market global segments. In the 1960’s Nike was only making running shoes. At this point in time not many people knew of Nike or the Nike swoosh. In order to increase brand awareness, they started paying athletes to wear their shoes. However, very soon Nike learnt that in order to be a global brand they needed to appeal to different market segments, not just athletes. Hence, they then decided to tap more markets. In order to d so, they discovered 3 very distinctive market segments that they could attract. The highest on the pyramid were the Ultimate/Performance Athletes. These included big names in the fields of running sports. They are†¦show more content†¦2. How did Nike penetrate the European soccer footwear market? Entering the European market would be a challenge for Nike because of Adidas, a German sports brand, already prevalent in the market. Nike knew it had to do something really strong and powerful to make a presence in the continent of Europe. Nike decided to enter the European market through soccer. They realized that if they truly wanted to be a global brand, they could not leave the sport of soccer behind and had to create a great product that would be able to connect with the soccer players. They also diversified to soccer to be more international. Unlike the strategy they used for the American market, in order to gain more brand awareness in the European market Nike started to support some of the major football championships in the continent. They increased their budget from 10million dollars to 100 million dollars to enter the European market. They also started associating the brand to world known soccer legends like Ronaldo and paired up with the winning team of the world cup soc cer tournament. This made people believe that Nike was a performance shoe that was used by major athletes all over the world. This largely increased their awareness and also their revenues. Their profits went to billions form millions. Today, anyone can easily tell that the Swoosh means Nike. 3. What are the key driving forces behind Nike’s international competitiveness? Today 97% of the peopleShow MoreRelatedNike Case Study1004 Words   |  5 PagesRSS Case Study: E-recruitment gets Nike on track Posted by HR Zone in Strategies on Thu, 09/12/2004 - 16:54 0 inShare The Nike employer brand is extremely powerful in attracting potential talent to the business making the process of handling applications and supporting the resourcing process effectively and efficiently critical to business success; implementing e-recruitment was identified as the way to solve this businesses hiring problems. The issue Nike currently receives aroundRead MoreNike Case Study1494 Words   |  6 PagesIntroduction: This paper is a case study of Nike Inc. I will give a brief overview of the history, products, company goals, company challenges, financial report and sourcing strategies. My main sources of information are internet databases, company annual reports, and financial articles. Company Overview: Nike Nike incorporated, the worlds leading designer and marketer of authentic athletic footwear, apparel, equipment, and accessories for a wide variety of sports and fitness activitiesRead MoreCase Study Nike765 Words   |  4 Pagesï » ¿Amanda Merkatz Management 301-02 Case Study 11 11252895 1. How does Nike’s decision to retain an in-house arm of ad agency Wieden Kennedy exemplify the concept of organizational design? The decision to retain an in-house arm of ad agency exemplify the concept of organizational design, makes you look at how both companies interpret organizational design. Organizational design is the process of creating structures that accomplish the company’s missions and objectives. First looking at the textRead MoreCase Study on Nike1252 Words   |  6 PagesCase Study Nike Introduction Good morning ladies and gentlemen and thank for taking the time to meet with us. Nike was founded on January 25, 1964 as Blue Ribbon Sports by Bill Bowerman and Philip Knight. The company officially became Nike, Inc. on May 30, 1978. Nike has various products which include footwear as well as other apparel that compliment the former. This accounts for 92 percent of the company’s revenue. The other 8 percent comes from equipment and non Nike brand products, such as ColeRead MoreNike Case Study1779 Words   |  8 PagesNike Case Study Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements For Master of Business Administration Degree Tiffin University at University of Bucharest Information and Decision Support Course By Ciprian Jitaru Instructor: Prof. John J. Millar Ph.D. Dean Emeritus and Professor of Management Cohort 9 November 06, 2010 1. What external and internal pressures did Mark Parker face when he assumed the leadership of Nike, and how did he respond to this challenges? Read MoreNike Case Study1104 Words   |  5 PagesCase Study- Nike 1. Discuss how Nikes growth can be attributed to its targeting of diverse market global segments. In the 1960’s Nike was only making running shoes. At this point in time not many people knew of Nike or the Nike swoosh. In order to increase brand awareness, they started paying athletes to wear their shoes. However, very soon Nike learnt that in order to be a global brand they needed to appeal to different market segments, not just athletes. Hence, they then decided to tap moreRead MoreNike Case Study899 Words   |  4 PagesCorporation Case Study: Nike What is it? NIKE, Inc. is the world’s leading innovator in athletic footwear, apparel, equipment and accessories. Before there was the Swoosh, before there was Nike, there were two visionary men who pioneered a revolution in athletic footwear that redefined the industry. Nike Employees Nike Employee Networks are designed to help Nike move toward greater diversity. In the U.S., six employee networks focus attention on important communities within Nike. The intendedRead MoreNike Case Study5183 Words   |  21 PagesNike Case Study The US-based Nike Corporation announced that it had generated profits of $97.4 million, around $48 million below its earlier forecast for the third quarter ended February 28, 2001. The company said that the failure in the supply chain software installation by i2 Technologies3 was the cause of this revenue shortfall. This admission of failure also affected the companys reputation as an innovative user of technology. The supply chain software implementation was the first part ofRead MoreNike Case Study1542 Words   |  7 Pagesin the stocks of Nike for the fund that she manages. †¢ Ford should base her decision on data on the company which were disclosed in the 2001 fiscal reports. While Nike management addressed several issues that are causing the decrease in market sales and prices of stocks, management presented its plans to improve and perform better. †¢ Third party sources also gave their opinions on whether the stock was a sound investment. WACC CALCULATION: Cost of Capital Calculations: Nike Inc Cohen calculatedRead MoreNike Case Study1219 Words   |  5 PagesCase Discussion Questions 1. Should Nike be held responsible for working conditions in foreign factories that it does not own, but where subcontractors make products for Nike? Some people probably think that designing and marketing its products is what Nike is responsible for. But outsourcing its manufacturing divisions into foreign countries doesn ´t release Nike from the responsibility. During a developing process manufacturing is one of the most important intermediate steps and because of

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

The Blindside Free Essays

The blindside movie versus the book Robert ward Chowan University This paper was prepared for [critical thinking 102, section c], taught by Professor Collins Blindside truths and lies In the movie the blindside there are many truths and differences from the book. Some of them more evident than others. In this movie/book critique I will explain the many truths and lies, to better explain the real story of Michael oher. We will write a custom essay sample on The Blindside or any similar topic only for you Order Now Some key examples of the truths are the truth of big mikes parents; also what are the toughys real professions. Key examples of lies between the two stories would be how the toughys actually discovered big mike, was Michael really a timid player as portrayed in the movie, and did mike really throw a rival player a fence in a high school game. The Blind Side true story reveals that Michael’s birth mother had been addicted to crack cocaine. (ChasingtheFrog. om, 2013) this was also clearly stated in the movie, just like mikes father which in the movie we learn he was murdered but in the book we learn in detail that he was shot and thrown off an over pass. (The Blind Side: Evolution of Game 2012). other than the truths about big mikes real parents we also learn about the toughys. In reality Leanne was actually an interior decorator who eventually helped Michael decorate his own house. Sean toughy was also an owner of a major fast food chain. One of the most disputed facts was when in the movie did Michael ever have a bed to himself. We learn from a comparison of the book and movie that is was truly stated that until moving in with the toughys Michael had never had a bed to himself being he had eleven other siblings growing up. There are actually a lot of similarities in the movie and the book but most are very small and not easily noticed. What you have to understand when looking at a movie or reading a book based on the same story is that it is basically impossible to have everything due to the facts that they are ortrayed by two different directors perspectives , and a movie can’t last nearly as long as a book. There are many false truths about the blindside either to make a better story or the actual truth was not known at the time the movie was created. One example would be who was the first family member to make contact with Michael. In the movie we find that big mike was first approached by Leanne when she s potted him walking in the rain at night. The book says that sean senior saw him Collins volleyball game picking up old popcorn. The actuality is that Collins noticed the large man mike and told her father who began to pay for mikes lunch when he realized he did not have the money to buy it himself. Another example would be did mike actually fight in hurt village as seen in the movie. The truth is that was false to he did fight but the person who he fought was a teammate at ole miss. The reasons for the fight are the same though. Works Cited ChasingtheFrog. com. (2013). Retrieved march 3, 2013, from ChasingtheFrog. com: http://www. chasingthefrog. com/reelfaces/blindside. php How to cite The Blindside, Papers

Saturday, May 2, 2020

Shimla the Hill Queen free essay sample

After independence, city became the capital of Punjab and was later named the capital of Himachal Pradesh. Shimla came into existence from 1st Sept,1972 on the reorganisation of the districts of the state. After the reorganisation, the erstwhile Mahasu district and its major portion was merged with Shimla. Its name has been derived from the goddess Shyamala Devi, an incarnation of the Hindu goddess Kali. As of 2011 Shimla comprises 19 erstwhile hill states mainly Balson, Bushahr, Bhaji and Koti, Darkoti, Tharoch Dhadi, Kumharsain, Khaneti Delath, Dhami, Jubbal, Keothal, Madhan, Rawingarh, Ratesh, and Sangri. As a large and growing city, Shimla is home to many well-recognized colleges and research institutions in India. The city has a large number of temples and palaces. Shimla is also well noted for its buildings styled in Tudorbethan and neo-Gothic architecture dating from the colonial era. History The bridge connecting Shimla with Minor Shimla, erected in 1829 by Lord Combermere, Shimla, 1850s Shimla, along with Almora, Kumaon, Garhwal, Sirmaur, Dehradun and Kangra, was invaded and captured by Prithvi Narayan Shah of Nepal. Shortly later, the British East India Company with local kings went to war with Nepal from 1814 to 1816. At the conclusion of the war, as a result of the Sugauli Treaty, all these captured parts of North India were ceded to the British East India company. At that time, Shimla was known for the temple of Hindu Goddess Shyamala Devi, and not as a city as it is today. Not long after gaining possession of Shimla, the British began to develop the area. The Scottish civil servant Charles Pratt Kennedy built the first British summer home in the town in 1822. Lord Amherst, the Governor-General of Bengal from 1823 to 1828, set up a summer camp here in 1827, when there was only one cottage in the town, and only half a dozen when he left that year. There were more than a hundred cottages within ten years. Shimla soon caught the eye of Lord William Bentinck, the next Governor-General of Bengal from 1828 (later of India, when the title was created in 1833) to 1835. In a letter to Colonel Churchill in 1832, he wrote â€Å" Simla is only four days march from Loodianah (Ludhiana), is easy of access, and proves a very agreeable refuge from the burning plains of Hindoostaun (Hindustan). Rashtrapati Niwas, Observatory Hill, Shimla, the former Viceregal Lodge, completed in 1888 now the Indian Institute of Advanced Study One of his successors, Sir John Lawrence (Viceroy of India 1864–1869), decided to take the trouble of moving the administration twice a year between Calcutta and this separate centre over 1,000 miles away, despite the fact tha t it was difficult to reach. Lord Lytton (Viceroy of India 1876–1880) made efforts to plan the town from 1876, when he first stayed in a rented house, but began plans for a Viceregal Lodge, later built on Observatory Hill. A fire cleared much of the area where the native Indian population lived (the Upper Bazaar), and the planning of the eastern end to become the centre of the European town forced these to live in the Middle and Lower Bazaars on the lower terraces descending the steep slopes from the Ridge. The Upper Bazaar was cleared for a Town Hall, with many facilities such as library and theatre, as well as offices—for police and military volunteers as well as municipal administration. During the Hot Weather, Simla was also the Headquarters of the Commander-in-Chief, India, the head of the Indian Army, and many Departments of the Government. The summer capital of the regional Government of the Punjab moved from Murree, in modern-day Pakistan, to Shimla in 1876. They were joined by many of the British wives and daughters of the men who remained on the plains. Together these formed Simla Society, which, according to Charles Allen,[4] was as close as British India ever came to having an upper crust. This may have been helped by the fact that it was very expensive, having an ideal climate and thus being desirable, as well as having limited accommodation. British soldiers, merchants, and civil servants moved here each year to escape from the heat during summer in the Indo-Gangetic plain. The presence of many bachelors and unattached men, as well as the many women passing the hot weather there, gave Simla a reputation for adultery, and at least gossip about adultery: as Rudyard Kipling said in a letter cited by Allen, it had a reputation for frivolity, gossip and intrigue. See also. [5]) Passenger train on the Kalka-Shimla Railway route The Kalka-Shimla railway line, constructed in 1906, added to Shimlas accessibility and popularity. The railway route from Kalka to Shimla, with more than 806 bridges and 103 tunnels, was touted as an engineering feat and came to be known as the British Jewel of the Orient. [5] In 2008, it became part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site, Mountain railways of India. [6] Not only that, there was a significant Muslim population in the region before the partition of British India. In addition, Shimla was the capital of the undivided state of Punjab in 1871, and remained so until the construction of the new city of Chandigarh (the present-day capital of Punjab)[dubious – discuss] Upon the formation of the state of Himachal Pradesh in 1971, Shimla was named its capital. Pre-independence structures still dot Shimla; buildings such as the former Viceregal Lodge, Auckland House, Christ Church, Gorton Castle, Shimla Town Hall and The Gaiety Theatre are reminders of British rule in India. [7][8] The original Peterhoff, another Viceregal residence, burned down in 1981. British Simla extended about a mile and a half along the ridge between Jakhoo Hill and Prospect Hill. The central spine was The Mall, which ran along the length of the ridge, with a Mall Extension southwards, closed to all carriages except those of the Viceroy and his wife. Geography Skating at Simla, c. 1905 Shimla lies in the north-western ranges of the Himalayas. It is located at 31. 61 °N 77. 10 °E with an average altitude of 2397. 59 meters (7866. 10 ft) above mean sea level, the city is spread on a ridge and its seven spurs. The city stretches nearly 9. km from east to west. [9] The highest point in Shimla, at 2454 meters (8051 ft), is the Jakhoo hill. Shimla is a Zone IV (High Damage Risk Zone) per the Earthquake hazard zoning of India. Weak construction techniques and increasing population pose a serious threat to the already earthquake prone region. [10][11] There are no bodies of water near the main city and the closest river, Sutlej, is about 21 km (13 mi) away. [12] O ther rivers that flow through the Shimla district, although further from the city, are Giri, and Pabbar (both are tributaries of Yamuna). The green belt in Shimla planning area is spread over 414 hectares (1023 acres). [5] The main forests in and around the city are that of pine, deodar, oak and rhododendron. [13] Environmental degradation due to the increasing number of tourists every year without the infrastructure to support them has resulted in Shimla losing its popular appeal as an ecotourism spot. [14] Another rising concern in the region are the frequent number of landslides that often take place after heavy rains. [10][15] Climate Shimla features a subtropical highland climate under the Koppen climate classification. The climate in Shimla is predominantly cool during winters, and moderately warm during summer. Temperatures typically range from ? 4  °C (25  °F) to 31  °C (88  °F) over the course of a year. [16] The average temperature during summer is between 19  °C (66  °F) and 28  °C (82  °F), and between ? 1  °C (30  °F) and 10  °C (50  °F) in winter. Monthly precipitation varies between 15 millimetres (0. 59 in) in November to 434 millimetres (17. in) in August. It is typically around 45 millimetres (1. 8 in) per month during winter and spring and around 175 millimetres (6. 9 in) in June as the monsoon approaches. The average total annual precipitation is 1,575 millimetres (62 in), which is much less than most other hill stations but still greatly heavier than on the plains. Snowfall in the region, which historically has taken place in the month of December, has lately (over the last fifteen years) been happening in January or early February every year. [17] Economy

Tuesday, March 24, 2020

Ibsen and Feminism free essay sample

This paper introduces and discusses feminism in two of Henrik Ibsens plays. A paper which introduces and discusses feminism in two Henrik Ibsen plays, Hedda Gabler, and A Dolls House. Specifically it shows the roles of the two main characters, Nora and Hedda, and their lifestyle situations to illustrate the problems with the female role (feminism) in the Victorian times between 1880-1890. No good Victorian woman would ever admit to hating a child so much, or hating another so much. The perfect wife was an active participant in the family, fulfilling a number of vital tasks, the firs of which was childbearing (Vicinus ix). She is the embodiment of evil in this third act, and the embodiment of everything that would shock and appall staid Victorian society. While her actions may be Ibsens commentary on the more than strict rules that governed women in Victorian times, her behavior is still so deviant that she cannot survive in the end. We will write a custom essay sample on Ibsen and Feminism or any similar topic specifically for you Do Not WasteYour Time HIRE WRITER Only 13.90 / page She is the opposite of everything that is right and good about the time, and she must not be allowed to survive, or the society around her would not be able to survive.

Friday, March 6, 2020

Free Essays on Freud on Religion

The following paper contains an attempt to define Sigmund Freud's perception of religion. After defining his perception, I will then attempt to point out to a couple of strengths and weaknesses contained in his definition. Freud believed religion was a cultural product, the creation of civilization itself. Civilization's principal task was to defend humankind against nature (Freud, pg. 19). It accomplished this by generating religious ideas in response to nature and fate. By humanizing the elements of nature, nature no longer seemed like a blind force insensitive to humans, but any emotional being capable of feeling sympathy and showing mercy. Religion made the untouchable forces of nature become acts of will and not just something that happens without any rational reasoning. It gave the forces of nature the qualities of a father figure, powerful yet merciful, and turned them into gods (Freud, p. 17). Finally, religion gave civilization a sense of control over one of its greatest fears, death. Religious beliefs in all societies have some idea of the way ultimate reality should be, and how things ultimately should be in the universe. Religion gave individual life a higher purpose. It gave hope after de ath. Religious beliefs made death less a fearsome end and made it simply a passing by command of a superior intelligence (Freud, p. 19). A superior intelligence who orders everything for the best (Freud p. 19). And a place where all good is rewarded and all evil is punished, and all of the hardships and sufferings of life are obliterated (Freud, p. 19). Religions therefore made the awesome elements of nature, especially death, appear much less threatening to civilization and gave a sense of influence over nature. Secondly, Freud believed that religion was an illusion. Religious ideas are not based on experiences of rational thinking, but our illusions based on the "most urgent, strongest, and oldest wishes of mankind" (Freud, p. 30). ... Free Essays on Freud on Religion Free Essays on Freud on Religion The following paper contains an attempt to define Sigmund Freud's perception of religion. After defining his perception, I will then attempt to point out to a couple of strengths and weaknesses contained in his definition. Freud believed religion was a cultural product, the creation of civilization itself. Civilization's principal task was to defend humankind against nature (Freud, pg. 19). It accomplished this by generating religious ideas in response to nature and fate. By humanizing the elements of nature, nature no longer seemed like a blind force insensitive to humans, but any emotional being capable of feeling sympathy and showing mercy. Religion made the untouchable forces of nature become acts of will and not just something that happens without any rational reasoning. It gave the forces of nature the qualities of a father figure, powerful yet merciful, and turned them into gods (Freud, p. 17). Finally, religion gave civilization a sense of control over one of its greatest fears, death. Religious beliefs in all societies have some idea of the way ultimate reality should be, and how things ultimately should be in the universe. Religion gave individual life a higher purpose. It gave hope after de ath. Religious beliefs made death less a fearsome end and made it simply a passing by command of a superior intelligence (Freud, p. 19). A superior intelligence who orders everything for the best (Freud p. 19). And a place where all good is rewarded and all evil is punished, and all of the hardships and sufferings of life are obliterated (Freud, p. 19). Religions therefore made the awesome elements of nature, especially death, appear much less threatening to civilization and gave a sense of influence over nature. Secondly, Freud believed that religion was an illusion. Religious ideas are not based on experiences of rational thinking, but our illusions based on the "most urgent, strongest, and oldest wishes of mankind" (Freud, p. 30). ...

Wednesday, February 19, 2020

Women's Sexuality and Violence linked through Feminism Writing Skills Essay

Women's Sexuality and Violence linked through Feminism Writing Skills - Essay Example Women's Sexuality and Violence linked through Feminism Writing Skills The main objective of this paper is to conduct a research study of the alternate feminist treatments of traditional, patriarchal Western fairy tales and popular myths in the works of Angela Carter, with a special reference to her revolutionary work- The Bloody Chamber (1979), which is a collection of re-told  fairy tales. The work captures the author’s powerful and passionate delineation of  the links between myth, sexuality and violence in constructing female subjectivity. The Bloody Chamber revels in the power of female aspiration to re-imagine and reconstruct the world. The history of violence against women is tough to track, yet it is claimed that violence against women has been accepted, excused and legally sanctioned until the late 19th-century. The practice of violence against women was tangled to the notion of women being viewed as property and the historically unequal power relations between men and women. (UN, 1993) Even today, violence against women is an existi ng reality and "there is no region of the world, no country and no culture in which women’s freedom from violence has been secured." (UN, 2013) Specific forms of violence are more prevalent in specific parts of the world. For example, incidents of dowry violence, acid throwing and bride burning are common in countries such as India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Cambodia and Nepal; honour killings in the Middle East and South Asia; trafficking and forced marriage in some parts of Sub-Saharan Africa and Oceania. (UN, 2013) It is unfortunate that women are targets of unwanted sexual attention even in the modern era of violence-prevention. Women nowadays face sexual harassment on a daily basis even in schools, colleges and workplaces, and this takes a toll on their health, work and studies. Morgan and Gruber provide an extensive coverage on the current state of prevention methods and research studies on violence against women in their book â€Å"Sexual Harassment: Violence a gainst women at work and in schools† The authors Morgan and Gruber have summarised the results of research that say schools where sexual harassment is usually considered as rare occurrence are in reality the ones where girls face high rates of severe harassment. It also reveals the astonishing fact that the men whom women love and trust the most are the ones who violate the very essence of womanhood. (Morgan & Gruber, 2011) Women often succumb to poor health and non-fatal injuries subsequent to incidents of sexual violence. What is even more shocking is that most of these women lack access to treatment, owing to various social and cultural factors. Men are usually reluctant to acquire help from social service organizations, but usually permit women and children to seek medical or psychological help. Hence the need of the hour is that the health care practitioners should focus more and more on the victimised women, in order to increase access to treatment. Susan Staggs and Step hanie Riger, in their journal article â€Å"Effects of Intimate Partner Violence on Low-Income Women’s Health and Employment†, summarise the results of a survey conducted on women of the low-income group, which shows that intimate partner violence and low health is high among these women. (Staggs & Riger, 2005) Research has suggested various theories on why men exert violence on women and has identified the associated risk factors of men. Many thinkers believe that relational factors